Rare and Collectable Oriental Antiques


Antique Chinese Furniture, Tables, Cabinets and artifacts
Authentic Oriental Craftsmanship, sourced from the original Chinese owners, amazing conversation pieces that bring unique character to your home

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789

Wanzai Altar Table

YEAR: Circa 1855

MATERIAL:
CAMPHOR & HARDWOOD

PLACE OF ORIGIN :
Wanzai township, Jiangxi Provence, China

Horseshoe Bench

YEAR: Replica

MATERIAL:
ELM

PLACE OF ORIGIN :
HANGZHOU CITY, ZHEJIANG PROVINCE, CHINA

carved kitchen cabinet, hardwood 140yrs

Hangzhou Cabinet

YEAR: Circa 1860

MATERIAL:
CHINESE FIR

PLACE OF ORIGIN :
HANGZHOU CITY, ZHEJIANG PROVINCE, CHINA

camphor and chinese fir carved and painted cabinet 130yrs

 

Wenzhou Cabinet

YEAR: Circa 1870

MATERIAL:
CAMPHOR & CHINESE FIR

PLACE OF ORIGIN :
WENZHOU CITY, ZHEJIANG PROVINCE, CHINA


incense cabinet hand carved and panted, camphor 140yrs

Incense Cabinet

YEAR OF MAKING:
Circa 1860

MATERIAL:
CAMPHOR & CHINESE FIR

PLACE OF ORIGIN :
JANGXI PROVINCE, CHINA

armoire with Mao portrait 150yrs

Mao Cabinet

YEAR OF MAKING:
Circa 1850

MATERIAL:
CAMPHOR & HARDWOOD

PLACE OF ORIGIN :
JINYUN CITY, ZHEJIANG PROVINCE, CHINA

Chinese fir green kitchen cabinet 130yrs

Green Cabinet

YEAR OF MAKING:
Circa 1870

MATERIAL:
CHINESE FIR

PLACE OF ORIGIN :
ZHEJIANG PROVINCE, CHINA

wine cabinet repaierd with antique windows 150yrs

Shutter-Panel Cabinet

YEAR OF MAKING:
DOOR Circa 1850

MATERIAL:
CHINESE FIR & ELM

PLACE OF ORIGIN :
ZHEJIANG PROVINCE, CHINA

hardwood and camphor cabinet 140yrs

Lishui Cabinet

YEAR OF MAKING:
Circa 1860

MATERIAL:
HARDWOOD & CAMPHOR

PLACE OF ORIGIN :
JINYUN CITY, ZHEJIANG PROVINCE, CHINA


Chinese fire carved and painted cabinet 120yrs

Wenhou Cabinet

YEAR OF MAKING:
Circa 1880

MATERIAL:
CHINESE FIR

PLACE OF ORIGIN :
WENZHOU CITY, ZHEJIANG PROVINCE, CHINA

Stone Lions

MATERIAL:
White Stone

PLACE OF ORIGIN :
Inner Mongolia

 

Jiangxi Cabinet

YEAR: Circa 1870

MATERIAL:
CAMPHOR & HARDWOOD

PLACE OF ORIGIN :
JIANGXI PROVINCE, CHINA

Entrance Lions


Height: 95cm
Weight: est. 250Kg each

YEAR: Circa 1880

MATERIAL:
White Stone

PLACE OF ORIGIN :
Huzhou city, Zhejiang, China

Stone Buddha

 

DIMENSIONS CM:
H73 X W45 X D25

MATERIAL:
White Stone

PLACE OF ORIGIN :
Inner Mongolia

Shandong Cabinet

YEAR: Circa 1860

MATERIAL:
ELM

PLACE OF ORIGIN :
SHANDONG PROVINCE, CHINA

 

Yolk-Back Bench

YEAR: Replica

MATERIAL:
ELM

PLACE OF ORIGIN :
HANGZHOU CITY, ZHEJIANG PROVINCE, CHINA

 
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My career of product designer occasionally takes me to China, where my two American partners and I own and operate an outsource manufacturing business.
It didn't take long for me to notice the fascinating beauty and intricate construction of vernacular antique Chinese furniture. And I fell in love with it.

It is a sad fact that once my small collection of Chinese antique furniture is gone, what may become available in the future will be either unaffordable, or simply unavailable.
One thing is for sure, owning a piece of this beautiful furniture is not just a sign of good taste, it is a shrewd investment in an increasingly valuable market.

The first time you see this old Chinese furniture, you can't help but appreciating how each piece has been uniquely distressed with a lifetime of misadventure: you will become captivated by the character of each piece.
Traditional Chinese furniture is made with centuries of skill and craftsmanship from perhaps the oldest continuous civilization on earth.
Each piece has an unique personality of use and survival engrained into every part of its construction.
There is huge cultural value in pieces that have been worn down and worn out; they illustrate a story of the dramatic changes in Chinese society.

Also included among this small selection of Chinese antique furniture are one or two excellent reproductions, created by skilled craftsmen using the traditional techniques of cabinetmaking and finishing.
In Chinese culture, such reproductions of old beautiful pieces are still considered worthy antiques; the Chinese definition of the word ‘antique' being something that is beautiful and noble, not simply old.

If you know anything about China, you will know about the ending of thousands of years of Dynastic rule in the 20th century.
During the early years of communism, furniture was subjected to persecution as much as anything else, much of it being confiscated or destroyed because it symbolised the old ‘class society'.

After Mao passed, government officials in the early 1980's apparently concluded that by ‘imprisoning' the confiscated furniture, they were punishing the masses who could actually make use of it. So, much of it was redistributed with no thought to its original owners. For this reason, most Chinese owners rarely have any connection with the original owners of the furniture; perhaps a chicken farmer in northern China may have been given a calligraphy desk originally owned by a scholar from the south; needless to say such items were not used as originally intended and many suffered terrible misuse.